Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

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Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

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The reason why this may be important is that Goering's planned trip to the UK, which was cancelled because the war broke out, was arranged by MI6. A pacifist Welsh historian, a Great War flying ace, a butterfly-collecting businessman… Coffee With Hitler offers a rare glimpse into a motley crew who would provide the British government with better intelligence on the horrifying rise of the Nazis than anyone else. As a lesson of history, this excellent book is a sober reminder to policymakers to look at the evidence in plain sight. The story of Tennant, Conwell-Evans and Christie and their historical journey is an absorbing one, which casts light on many aspects of the period. A truly illuminating, humane and sophisticated book - and, one hopes, the first of many by an exciting new talent on the historical scene.

The 103 third parties who use cookies on this service do so for their purposes of displaying and measuring personalized ads, generating audience insights, and developing and improving products.Importantly, the author has provided a reliable and strong backdrop on the positions of various nations including Russia, Austria, Czechoslavakia (now The Czech Republic), Italy, France, and Spain (who were themselves split through civil war during the same period). Spicer’s book is a resounding success, retelling the fascinating history of the Anglo-German Fellowship. The second point is that the notes to the book are totally inadequate whether this is the author's fault or the publisher wishing to save space is not clear.

Or, finally, that it was probably Kim Philby who tipped off Moscow that Herman Göring was planning to fly to Oxfordshire for secret peace talks just before war was declared - causing the visit to be cancelled. The book works well as a companion to Tim Bouverie’s fine Appeasing Hitler, focusing less on the well-known events and figures of the era and more on the gentlemanly amateur diplomats of the day. This was accentuated by the accession of Edward VIII, a man who was described approvingly by Ribbentrop as “a kind of English National Socialist”. When Hitler rose to power in the early 1930s, public reaction in Britain was not that of unalloyed horror. Coffee With Hitler offers a rare glimpse into a motley crew who would provide the British government with better intelligence on the horrifying rise of the Nazis than anyone else.Or that Hitler himself was so adamant that neither Britain nor France would do anything if he invaded Poland, that when Britain's declaration of war finally arrived at his study in the Reich Chancellery he gave Ribbentrop an icy glare and said 'what now? One, this is a segment of a much larger story and there are elements about which we still know little and, perhaps, that will always be the case about such a controversial area of British History. and, in some circles, quiet satisfaction that a vigorous reformer had shaken up his country in an apparently effective and forward-looking fashion. It is also not entirely clear what their own agenda really was - where they willing to give Germany a free hand in eastern Europe, where they anti-communists or did they want a milder form of Nazism with which they could along with. Literary Review 'This is a complex tale, but as skillfully narrated by Spicer, it moves along briskly.

A truly illuminating, humane and sophisticated book – and, one hopes, the first of many by an exciting new talent on the historical scene.Instead, it lay somewhere between disinterest, snobbish, if inaccurate, contempt (“the man’s a house painter! Coffee With Hitler offers a rare glimpse into a motley crew who would provide the British government with better intelligence on the horrifying rise of the Nazis than anyone else. Both appeasers and civilisers overrated their own abilities and underestimated the evils to which they – largely unwittingly – played handmaiden.

The process starts in June 1934 with efforts continuing right-up to the outbreak of the second world war in September 1939; with the addition of a further crucial commentary on the period from September 1939 through to May 1941.

Drawing on newly discovered primary sources, Charles Spencer sheds light on the early career of Kim Philby, Winston Churchill’s approach to appeasement, the US entry into the war and the Rudolf Hess affair, in a groundbreaking reassessment of Britain’s relationship with Nazi Germany.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
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